The Natural Beauty of Pitcairn Island

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Photo Credit: Orana Travel

By Nicole Anderson

Located deep within the South Pacific is Pitcairn Island. This island is part of the Pitcairn Islands group of 4 islands: Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno. Scattered across several hundred miles of ocean, these islands only make up a combined land area of 47 square kilometres (18 square miles).

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Map of Pitcairn Islands (rough). Image credit: Holger Behr.

 

While Henderson Island accounts for 86% of the total land area, Pitcairn Island is the only island in the group that has any people at all. Even so, with a population of just 50, Pitcairn is the least populous national jurisdiction in the world!

Similar to Easter Island, Pitcairn makes the list of one of the most remote inhabited places in the world.

 

 

 

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The Pitcairn Islands group as shown (french Polynesia centered). Image by TUBS.

Just how remote?

Well, at latitude 25.04 South and longitude 130.06 West, Pitcairn Island is about 2,170km (1,350mi) South East of Tahiti and just over 6,600km (4,100mi) from Panama.

A small volcanic island hidden amongst the vast South Pacific Ocean, Pitcairn is just 3.2km (2mi) long and 1.6km (1mi) wide. You would need to be pretty good at navigation to find this place!

Believe it or not, the islands’ administrative headquarters is located in New Zealand (Auckland), some 5,310km (3,300mi) away! The Pitcairn islands are the last remaining British Overseas Territory in the South Pacific.

 

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NASA Satellite Image of Pitcairn Island in the South Pacific Ocean.

 

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Love the signpost they have on Pitcairn Island. You know which direction and how far… Image: www.government.pn

 

History and claim to fame

Pitcairn Island is undoubtedly most well-known (through numerous books and 5 films) as the place where the survivors at large from the famous ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’ settled.

This true story starts with the action led by Fletcher Christian when he and his gang of mutineers took over the HMS Bounty and cast-off Captain Bligh and his loyal crew in a lifeboat on 28 April 1789. Left on board were a total of 25, including some loyalists who were kept on board against their will.

 

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Mutiny: HMS Bounty – The mutineers turning Bligh and part of the officers and crew adrift from the Bounty, 29 April 1789 – National Maritime Museum.

 

Captain Bligh and his men made it back to England and the Admiralty dispatched the HMS Pandora to apprehend the mutineers. Many of the mutineers as well as the remaining loyalists were discovered at Tahiti and were returned to England where mutineers faced trial (4 were acquitted, 3 were pardoned, 3 were hanged and 4 actually died on the journey home). However, Fletcher Christian and 8 other mutineers had fled in the Bounty with a number of Tahitians and eventually found and settled on Pitcairn Island.

Although the mutineers remained undiscovered on Pitcairn Island until 1808, only one of the mutineers (John Adams) remained alive by then. All the remaining mutineers (including Fletcher Christian) had killed each other over time due to varying conflicts (or in Ned Young’s case, died from asthma). No action was taken against John Adams.

Today the Pitcairn Islanders are a bi-racial ethnic group descendent mostly from the 9 mutineers and the Tahitians that accompanied them. The current inhabitants originate from 4 main families. There have also been a number of other descendants that have subsequently migrated to live on Norfolk Island and many descendants still live there today.

 

Getting to Pitcairn Island

Travelling with the intent to land on Pitcairn Island today is quite a challenge. Although not anywhere near as challenging as the late 1700s, is nevertheless not easy or straight-forward when compared to other holiday destinations.

First, you need to make the journey to Papeete, Tahiti. Depending on where you have started from, that could be one long journey to start with, but your arrival in Papeete is just the first step to reaching Pitcairn.

From Papeete, you then need to catch a flight (that leaves once a week on a Tuesday) to Mangareva. From there you take a ferry ride from the airport to Rikitea Village. From Rikitea Village you board the vessel MV Claymore II where you will take a 32-hour crossing to finally reach Pitcairn Island.

 

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MV Claymore II being met by long boat, Pitcairn Island. Photo Credit: www.government.pn

 

The cost of the sea passage on MV Claymore II to deliver you to Pitcairn is NZ $5,000.00 per person return, not including the flights needed to Papeete or Mangareva or the ferry to Rikitea Village. Costs for staying on the island start from US$70.00 per person, per night for homestay accommodation.

Otherwise, if you are not intent on spending part of your holidays on the island itself, you can take a cruise that has Pitcairn on its itinerary, and still see and appreciate so much of its natural beauty without having to stay there.

 

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Sunrise on our initial approach to Pitcairn Island. Photo: Nicole Anderson.

 

The natural landscape

Not exactly easily accessible due to its steep cliffs, treacherous rocks and choppy waters, the only ‘safe’ (a term used somewhat loosely here) way into land is via one of the island’s long boats that will transport you from your ship to their boat ramp.

 

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Not the easiest island to come ashore. Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA.

 

The boat ramp is located within Bounty Bay. This area is where the HMS Bounty was set ablaze and sunk on 23 January 1790 where the wreck remains today.

 

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Bounty Bay, Pitcairn Island at dawn. Also, you can see the boat ramp entry to the island here. Photo credit: Makemake.

 

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Closer shot of the Pitcairn Island boat ramp entry. Photo: Nicole Anderson.

 

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Adamstown and the Boat Ramp in the same shot. Photo: Nicole Anderson

 

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The Landing at Pitcairn Island as seen from above on the island. Photo: www.government.pn

 

For those that do make it ashore, they can then proceed up a road named “The Hill of Difficulty” along which you will eventually find yourself in the community of Adamstown (named after the last surviving mutineer John Adams). Adamstown is the capital of Pitcairn and the rest of the island is mostly natural and undeveloped.

 

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Adamstown, named after mutineer John Adams. Photo: www.government.pn

 

Here is a short video of someone that went ashore to film Adamstown which provides a bit of a feel for the island (3 mins, 27 secs):

 

 

My Impressions of Pitcairn Island

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Beautiful Pitcairn Island. Photo: Nicole Anderson.

It’s hard to imagine what it would be like to actually live there with just 49 other people in such a remote location, even among such natural beauty.

I know from what I’ve seen with my own eyes that there is no questioning how lovely and untouched most of nature is on the island. Costs aside, this would be an absolute ideal vacation to really unplug from the craziness that is the modern-day world. Here you could really connect with nature and clear your mind while exploring this fascinating island.

However, actually living a life in such isolation and in such proximity to so few others, is not something many of us would seriously consider. The Pitcairn Islanders recognise that it takes a special type of person that would want to move and live there.

 

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Nicole Anderson and fiance James Visser at Pitcairn Island, South Pacific.

 

In fact, the island launched an incentive campaign to encourage people to immigrate by offering free land to build a home:

 

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Pitcairn Island-Living – Image Credit – John Rieber

 

They also made a short video (1 min, 3 secs) to promote immigration to live on Pitcairn Island:

 

If you ever want to consider this as an option for your life you can get more details by clicking here.

Here is a video that is a bit longer and covers the recent visit of Governor Laura Clarke (who is the British High Commissioner based in Wellington, New Zealand) and shows what was involved in her journey and her experience visiting Pitcairn. It shows more of the natural landscape as well as interviews with some key locals who discuss the future of the island (14 mins, 7 secs).

 

 

Would you not also want to spend at least a bit of time visiting such a lovely place?

 

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Sailing away from Pitcairn bound for Easter Island. Photo: Nicole Anderson.

 

As we sailed further away from this amazing paradise, I couldn’t help but wonder what life must be like there back when the occupants of the Bounty arrived and how things have evolved to the present day.

 

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Relaxing on lounges at the aft of the ship as we bid bon voyage to Pitcairn Island. Photo: Nicole Anderson.

 

I truly hope that there will be a good future in store for Pitcairn Island that is in the long-term interests of its residents while preserving the beauty that makes this unique place so special.

Nicole

 

Founder and Publisher at | Website

Outdoor adventure enthusiast that loves nature having travelled locations across North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia.

Passionate Travel Writer, Blogger and Influencer.

128 thoughts on “The Natural Beauty of Pitcairn Island

  • January 18, 2019 at 7:09 pm
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    I love camping – it looks gorgeous! I had never heard of the island before. My mom was born and raised on an island and we go back to visit all the time – I never tire of the beach!

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    • January 21, 2019 at 12:28 pm
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      Well unfortunately as mentioned above Elisha, there’s no camping to be had here and there’s a lot of cliff faces and hardly anything at all in terms of a beach. Nevertheless, it does have a lot going for it in terms of being a beautiful island. Thanks for reading and commenting.

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  • January 17, 2019 at 5:10 pm
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    Wow, Pitcairn Island sounds like an awesome place to visit! You look like you had a fab time with your fiance on your trip. I have never heard of this island before, but it sounds amazing!

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    • January 18, 2019 at 5:36 am
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      It sure is Jocelyn! It’s just one of those very unique and special places that, together with its history, really fires up your imagination, while also being very peaceful at the same time.

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  • January 17, 2019 at 3:14 pm
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    Wow that looks like the place to be. I have bookmarked this post for future reference. Thank you for sharing this. Great post!

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  • January 17, 2019 at 10:16 am
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    Thanks for sharing yet another beautiful island destination and one I would have never discovered if it wasn’t for your post maybe. I would like to visit it one day but perhaps once the children are a little older as I can see the terrain is quirky. The views are absolutely astonishing and a photographers paradise I must say.

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    • January 18, 2019 at 5:31 am
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      Completely understand you not wanting to bring young children here Amar – the terrain is definitely quite unsafe. The location is indeed a photographer’s dream as it is hard to take a bad photo there.

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  • January 17, 2019 at 7:03 am
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    The place looks beautiful and away from the hustle and bustle. This will be such a relaxing experience. I would definitely like to visit

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  • January 17, 2019 at 4:26 am
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    This looks gorgeous! I love isolated hideaways and islands fit that perfect description.

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  • January 15, 2019 at 2:21 am
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    Nice article Nicole may be someday I can go to this island. Thank you for sharing this.

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  • January 13, 2019 at 10:18 pm
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    It seems as though you had an amazing, educational experience visiting this place. Thanks so much for sharing your adventures and photos/videos.

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  • January 13, 2019 at 5:12 pm
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    This was definitely an important post and very educational

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  • January 13, 2019 at 5:05 pm
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    Wow what a beautiful island! Only 49 people though, that would be quite the transition!

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  • January 13, 2019 at 10:23 am
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    I’ve not heard of this island before! Just reading about getting there is a journey itself. But it looks like it’s worth it!

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    • January 16, 2019 at 3:34 am
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      I would have to agree with you Nicol, I think it is worthwhile the way I did it – but I’m not sure about actually making the entire trip to land there. That would certainly require a whole different level of commitment.

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  • January 13, 2019 at 3:18 am
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    Wow! Even though it’s remote to get to, it definitely looks like it’s worth the effort! Thanks for sharing!

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  • January 12, 2019 at 2:04 pm
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    Wow only 49 people, I wonder how that would be like! I’m not used to living in such a small town. I loved this post, and like all posts it’s amazing to learn so much about different places in the world. I have never even heard of Pitcairn before and it just shows how very little we are in the great expanse of the world. Gorgeous photos by the way!

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    • January 12, 2019 at 9:32 pm
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      Thank you so much, Melissa. I am also not used to living with only so few people – never mind that it is also so isolated from anywhere else in the world. Indeed we are all very little when you think of everything else that there is on the globe that exists, with so much to see and experience.

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  • January 12, 2019 at 11:53 am
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    This looks like a very beautiful island to stay for the rest of my life on. haha I love your post!

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    • January 12, 2019 at 9:27 pm
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      Thanks so much, Adriana. I am sure there are many that would share that sentiment seeing how it looks and the way they have kept it from becoming polluted or spoiled. Certainly, a major factor that drives people to visit, knowing that only relatively few people make it there.

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  • January 12, 2019 at 9:24 am
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    Sounds like an amazing experience. I would just love to camp there. i am sure you enjoyed sharing something that is really quite different and special.

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    • January 12, 2019 at 9:22 pm
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      Definitely did enjoy writing and sharing this as it also brought back memories and my appreciation for this unique and picturesque place. I love the thought of camping there but as mentioned earlier, this is not something that is offered on the island. Nevertheless, it would be so great to explore the island and just chill out from the rest of your worries for a while. Thanks, Elizabeth for your comment.

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  • January 12, 2019 at 8:29 am
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    This looks like a fun trip and a great place to explore. We love going on family adventures!

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    • January 12, 2019 at 9:19 pm
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      Thanks, Katie. Yes, it was a fun trip but if you intend on taking smaller children onto the island itself, I would exercise a lot of caution as there are many sheer drops, rocks and quite rough water where it can be very dangerous for kids. Wonderful for their education though. Thank you for commenting.

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  • January 12, 2019 at 1:25 am
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    Never heard of Pitcairn Island but your post has convinced me to do more research. Great job.

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  • January 12, 2019 at 12:53 am
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    Breathtakingly beautiful. Places we go to and never wish to go home. I will gladly want a longer stay here. Such an amazing place as represented by the pictures shared. Wake me up if I fall asleep while I enjoy this beauty of nature.

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  • January 11, 2019 at 9:57 pm
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    What a stunning place, I’d love to be able to go one day and hike through those beautiful trails.

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    • January 12, 2019 at 8:04 am
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      It sure is quite stunning Kansas. Due to the size of the island, the trails may be steep in some places but it doesn’t take that long to hike them. Still fabulous views though in any direction or trail you care to take. Also, there was such a fabulous breeze there when we visited which was really lovely.

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  • January 11, 2019 at 8:00 pm
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    Wow! This was truly a great post to read, I have never even heard of Pitcairn Island. I could not even imagine living on island with just 49 other people. It truly amazes me how there are so many beautiful places in the world that are hidden away. Thank you so much for sharing!

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    • January 12, 2019 at 8:00 am
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      Many, many people certainly have never heard of Pitcairn Island Jennifer and I don’t think too many of us could realistically live there. It’s still nice to see something quite different like this though and learn and appreciate the history of this beautiful part of the world.

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  • January 11, 2019 at 7:50 pm
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    This looks like an amazing time and experience. I would just love to camp there.

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    • January 12, 2019 at 7:56 am
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      Thanks Sophia. I don’t think they allow camping on the island as the only type of arrangements you can make is a host-stay arrangement in one of the houses of the families that live on the island. The cost os around $70 per night as outlined in the post. Still would be a unique and fun experience though.

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  • January 11, 2019 at 6:55 pm
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    Seems that you really had a fun trip, I wish i could be there. Must say that Pitcairn is beautiful place to visit.Thanks for sharing your journey.

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  • January 11, 2019 at 3:07 pm
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    Wow. What a unique place. Can’t wait until my health and finances are in order enough to travel. Looks beautiful and interesting.

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    • January 12, 2019 at 7:51 am
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      Definitely beautiful and interesting Amy-Lynn. I hope you will be well enough and then budget for a trip out to Pitcairn as soon as practical… and be as impressed as I was.

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  • January 11, 2019 at 3:39 am
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    Wow this is like a little hidden gem. I swear there are so many little islands around this world that I have no clue about. Thanks for educating me on this beautiful island.

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  • January 10, 2019 at 2:17 pm
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    Pitcairn Island looks like a beautiful gem from above (Nasa view). One of the lesser known holiday destinations nonetheless looks like you had a great time together with your fiancee. I even thoroughly enjoyed the video clips.

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    • January 12, 2019 at 7:45 am
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      Thank you so much, Anahita. Yes, we did have a good time as we both do like to escape to places that are somewhat off the beaten path. I agree the video clips give us a greater appreciation of the island.

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  • January 9, 2019 at 10:33 am
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    What a great post Nicole! I always look for hidden gems in the middle of nowhere but I didn’t know about Pitcairn Island. I knew the story of the mutiny on the Bounty but I had no idea that the survivors used to live there. I love those islands where most of the territory is natural and undeveloped and where you can connect with nature and clear your mind, as you said. Moving to a place like that is tempting, as I love peace and silence around me, but I don’t know for how long I could live like that.
    It looks like you had a great time visiting this place. As a ship lover, I love to read stories of people who travel sailing around.

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    • January 10, 2019 at 2:14 am
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      Thank you so much Sara. Yes, travelling by ship is certainly relaxing and another way to unwind and connect with nature in the form of the deep blue sea and ocean breeze. I agree that it would be fun to think about moving there but the excitement and wonder would probably wear off after a while as you contemplate a future of only being there with such few people, so far away…

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  • January 8, 2019 at 1:50 pm
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    Pitcairn Island sounds really secluded and challenging as well. The history associated with the island adds to the aura of intrigue and mystery that seems to surround the island. But the island appears so pristine and untouched.

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    • January 10, 2019 at 2:07 am
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      That is true and I suppose much of that has to do with the fact that so few people get onto the island to mess up the environment there. Hence it remains looking so fabulous.

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  • January 7, 2019 at 8:08 pm
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    Pitcairn Island – never heard of it, never seen it before, but now I sooo badly want to go! Imagine how much a single blog post can do. I love how remote it is, I have always had a dream about traveling to some remote island in the South Pacific. I can only imagine the 32 hour crossing :O It seems to be well worth it though. I need to book a trip to Tahiti I feel. In need of some serious South Pacific adventures!

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    • January 10, 2019 at 2:04 am
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      That would be so wonderful Ann! Thank you so much for such a lovely comment. Just the thought of a remote island in the South Pacific is enough to make many of us dream about the possibilities. I am so pleased that this post awakened a desire in you to experience this. Thank you so much for reading and commenting and I hope to hear of your fabulous adventures in the Pacific one day.

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  • January 7, 2019 at 10:23 am
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    Those South Pacific islands are incredible! There is so many of them and they are all beautiful. I would love to just get a boat one day and explore them all. I think it would take me quite few days to get to Pitcairn Island from Europe but I am sure it would be worth it. Thank you for sharing those videos, it really shows how stunning this place is.

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    • January 10, 2019 at 2:00 am
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      You’re welcome Ada! That is indeed a great idea of yours to get a boat and explore all the islands in the South Pacific. It would take a really long time though to do it thoroughly…there a quite a few to get to and the South Pacific is certainly a huge place!

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  • January 6, 2019 at 4:22 pm
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    I’ve never heard of Pitcairn Island before, what a place! Looks quite remote but so beautiful, it reminds me of another remote place called Tristan da Cunha! Since it’s such a small community, I wonder if there’s a specific process to move there?

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    • January 10, 2019 at 1:56 am
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      Definitely Val, there is a similarity to Tristan da Cunha in regards to being so remote, although Tristan da Cunha of course is in the Atlantic as opposed to Pitcairn being in the Pacific. To answer your question, there is a process if you wanted to consider moving there. A website set up specifically to outline this is http://www.immigration.gov.pn/ (also the link is included within the post above).

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  • January 6, 2019 at 1:29 pm
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    I knew of the Pitcairn Islands before reading your post, but I wasn’t aware of its fascinating history. The scenery is amazing, but personally, I can’t imagine living on an island with a population of 49! The 32-hour ferry ride to get there might also be a bit of a deterrent. 🙂

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    • January 10, 2019 at 1:45 am
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      You said it Nancie! One heck of an effort needed to get there from a visitor standpoint. Beautiful scenery and nature though. However, living there though would be another story – something I think few of us could realistically imagine.

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  • January 6, 2019 at 8:20 am
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    Wow, such an amazing place to visit! I totally agree, it seems like the ideal place to unwind and escape every day life. Not sure I could manage the journey though!

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    • January 10, 2019 at 1:42 am
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      There is no doubting that there is a long way to travel to get there Jean, no matter which direction you come from. But, yes, it certainly would be a lovely place to unwind and escape for a while – even though it is quite a journey to get there (and back!).

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  • January 5, 2019 at 8:28 pm
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    Well, I love looking at those signs and counting how many places I’ve been to and how many I still have to see.

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  • January 5, 2019 at 12:42 pm
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    Pitcairn Island looks very intriguing. I’m surprised that it has a population of 50 people….as much as it’s very beautiful especially from above, I wouldn’t appreciate living there permanently.

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    • January 10, 2019 at 1:35 am
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      There is no doubt that the vast majority would agree with you Dalene. The beauty of such a place is something we can all appreciate but very few of us would really like to be so isolated from the rest of the world with just 50 people.

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  • January 4, 2019 at 8:46 pm
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    This is such an interesting post. I can’t believe just how remote the island is! It would be pretty crazy to live on an island with just 49 others. The cost seems quite prohibitive but nice to go as part of another cruise

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    • January 10, 2019 at 1:33 am
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      I couldn’t agree more David. Cruising is certainly the most cost-effective way to see such a remote place. Due to the deep water there, cruise ships can get incredibly close and you can see a lot of detail just from one of the decks. Cruise ships also circle the entire island more than once, often also turning around to circle the island in the opposite direction. Just doing that is a fabulous experience and allows you to see so much without the huge cost in time and money to set foot there.

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  • January 4, 2019 at 6:36 am
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    Pitcairn Island looks like quite an amazing place to be. The fact that it is hard to reach, and completely offbeat, makes the experience a lot more memorable.
    While I have watched Mutiny on the Bounty, I absolutely have no recollection of this place. But now after reading this article and watching the video, I so want to visit this offbeat island, for I am sure it’ll be an experience of a lifetime.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 7:49 am
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      It is so unique and unspoiled by tourism that I believe it is an unforgettable place which leaves a lasting impression Arnav. I’m sure you will get there if you are determined and driven as many have been to visit this amazing place. Once you return, I hope you would share your impressions with us.

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  • January 4, 2019 at 3:11 am
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    Looks beautiful, love it. I have not heard about this place, thank you for sharing this post. I won’t mind adding this to my go bucket list . I think my kids and husband would enjoy it here.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 8:50 pm
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    This place looks like something out of a movie! Beautiful and alluring, yet somewhat mysterious and daunting. Thanks for sharing these pictures! It’s like going on a virtual tour.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 4:17 am
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      Thanks so much for that lovely comment. It does really look idyllic and quite serene. Your second sentence does sum it up extremely well in a way I think a lot of people would agree. Thank you for reading and commenting.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 8:32 pm
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    I haven’t heard of Pitcairn Island before what an interesting history that island has. What an adventure to travel to the Island but all worth it it you want to escape the busy city life for a while and get back to basic.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 4:14 am
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      Thanks, Grace. Well if there’s one thing that Pitcairn would definitely offer, that would indeed be a total escape from it all! Getting back to basics is something you can relate to here and the fabulous ability to quietly connect with nature.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:50 pm
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    It sounds a bit taxing to reach. Not sure if I would be willing to make the journey since we travel with three young children. The landscape is beautiful though! Thanks for sharing.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 4:10 am
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      I can definitely understand what you mean Denisha. This is not the safest place for young children. However, it may be more of an attraction as they get older simply as it is a very unique and interesting place.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 2:12 pm
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    This was an excellent post. You provided so much information for anyone who wants to make the trip. Also the pictures were lovely!

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  • January 3, 2019 at 1:35 pm
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    It looks so beautiful there. I haven’t actually heard of this I think but I’m definitely intrigued.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 4:06 am
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      The lovely photos and film footage that has been taken of the island, together with the island’s fascinating history combine to create that sense of intrigue really well Jasmine. I’m sure it is a reason why people do end up going out of their way to visit and experience the place.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 12:07 pm
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    I must say that getting to Pitcairn sounds really exhausting, but the damn beauty of the island is totally worth the hassle of the travel. I have never heard of the island before but I am sure it is a really pretty place to visit. When in Tahiti, it is a good idea to fly so that you can reach Pitcairn? This was a completely new destination for me.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 4:02 am
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      In answer to your question Shreya, there is no landing strip at all on Pitcairn so flying directly there is not an option. You can fly from Papeete in Tahiti to Mangareva (flight goes once a week on Tuesdays). Once at Mangareva, you then take a ferry from the airport across to Rikitea Village. You then board the ship MV Claymore II where you make a 32-hour crossing in the South Pacific until you finally arrive at Pitcairn. It is definitely one heck of a trip to land on Pitcairn! But you are right, it is beautiful.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 4:22 am
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    I must admit that the rugged natural beauty is at odds with the news of sexual abuse among the islanders. The news was chilling to read. I’ll probably admire it from afar like you, especially given the costs involved.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:55 am
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      It’s certainly true that there were a lot of news reports around the sexual abuse that resulting in trials being conducted and people found guilty of same. More detail of this can be found online and of course, this is something that was terrible (as it is in any society). Such a shame that this should happen in such a beautiful place, although perhaps the level of isolation and the prevailing culture contributed to this in some way also. Thanks for your comment and perspective Nicholas.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:46 am
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    What a beautiful place and amazing journey! I would love to visit places like this with my kids when they are a little more older.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:49 am
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      It would certainly be a lot of fun and quite educational for them Ashton. I agree this is a place better suited to older rather than younger children from a safety perspective – and also a great learning perspective as well.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 12:03 am
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    4 islands together make 18 sq.miles! Whoa! That’s just so so tiny! That would make it so impeccably gorgeous!!
    50 people in the whole place??? That’s like one huge family! It must be so amusing… I can’t imagine a lot of things? Do they have hospital, school etc?
    Though free land sounds tempting, I’m concerned about healthcare and other facilities!

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:47 am
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      There is no doubt many people would absolutely agree with you Bhushavali. In fact, there used to be more than double the number of people living on Pitcairn until many of them migrated to Norfolk Island, where they continue to live today. Norfolk Island (closer to Australia) has many more facilities and a greater population. It is a dream life to live somewhere as beautiful and peaceful as Pitcairn but when things go wrong medically, it could be a big problem. For this and no doubt other reasons, not many people have responded to their call to move there.

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  • January 2, 2019 at 11:18 pm
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    I watched the video, and Pitcairn looks really isolated. Looks like a really cool place to check out.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:42 am
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      I would have to agree, Pheobe. Could be the perfect place for a bit of isolation and connection with nature if you plan a trip allowing enough time and budget. Thanks for reading and commenting.

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  • January 2, 2019 at 11:13 pm
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    This looks like a fantastic place to visit! I’l be adding this to my list for sure!

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  • January 2, 2019 at 10:22 pm
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    The place is beautiful, no doubt about that. Living there would just be like going back to the basics. I would consider building a home there, but only for vacations. I would miss having the chance to be able to keep in touch with family if I lived there.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:33 am
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      I’m definitely with you on that idea Kristine! Although I’m not sure we would be granted a building permit unless we were intending to move there to live. The idea though of having a holiday home there, however, is just fabulous!

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:31 am
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      It certainly is Tatiana! There is more detail on this within the post above and there is also a ton of information on this history online. Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment.

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  • January 2, 2019 at 9:41 pm
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    I’d never heard of that story of Captain Bligh at Pitcairn. I did know the island was very remote though – perhaps that’s why I’ve never really thought of it as a possible travel destination. This post makes me think again though!

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:29 am
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      Do let us know if you make it there at some stage Sarah. Its history reads as interesting as the island looks. Captain Bligh himself never travelled to the island and the leader of the mutineers (Fletcher Christian) was dead by the time the island was discovered by the British navy. It was definitely a good hiding spot without a doubt. Thanks so much for reading and commenting.

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  • January 2, 2019 at 5:44 pm
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    Wow what an adventure! Love the video, and I can just imagine how serene the island is with so little people. This is definitely a hidden haven and I think the experience of getting there itself is worth the journey!

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:24 am
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      Thanks so much, Daisy. Travelling there by ship on the Pacific Ocean can be a truly serene experience in itself and, I for one, certainly liked what I saw when we got to that location. Aside from the development that is Adamstown where everyone lives, the island is quite pristine.

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  • January 2, 2019 at 9:27 am
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    The nature looks amazing! Thanks for sharing

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  • January 2, 2019 at 8:32 am
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    Wow, while I have watched Mutiny on the Bounty, I admit I do not recall Pitcairn Island, and definitely the journey to get there is long (and I thought our trips from the US to India were long).. but the journey looks like it is worth it – both for the beauty and the uniqueness ..thank you for such an information filled post..

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  • January 1, 2019 at 2:10 pm
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    What an amazing cruise you took! My parents visited Pitcairn Island on one of their around the world cruises so it’s good that it gets some tourist traffic. It’s so far away from everything. I don’t have the temperament to live so isolated and with only 50 other people but it certainly is an attractive option to move there for the right person.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:15 am
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      How fabulous that your parents also got to experience Pitcairn, Annick! It does receive some, but not a lot, of tourism. Certainly, nothing compared to other more well known and easy-to-get-to places by comparison. I’m with you in that I don’t know how well I would go living there with so few people but it does make for a lovely holiday spot.

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  • January 1, 2019 at 11:41 am
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    I must admit I have never heard of Pitcairn islands before, which means I haven’t seen those 5 movies or read those books either. Surprising how many new things we learn from globetrotters like you. The volcanic islands look stunning indeed. The illustration from the national maritime museum also brings to life the history of this island.

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    • January 4, 2019 at 3:11 am
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      Thank you for such a lovely comment Sinjana. You are definitely not alone in never having heard of Pitcairn Island. Many only read up on it as they discover places to go on their vacation. It’s beauty and it’s history and both factors that draw people’s interest for sure.

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  • December 31, 2018 at 12:06 pm
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    A 32-hour crossing sounds exhausting! I heard about Pitcairn Island in ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’ and have always wanted to visit ever since. It must be an amazing experience. The remoteness of the place makes it even more appealing for me! Thank you for sharing

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  • December 31, 2018 at 11:45 am
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    Pitcairn looks like it would be a great getaway if even for a short while, but I’m not sure I could ever live there! Looking at the photos and reading about it makes me think of Lord of the Flies for some strange reason! A population of 50 is insane, I can’t imagine what it’d be like. I would still love to visit however, just so I can make the trip to Tahiti and visit Papeete! It sounds so beautiful!

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    • December 31, 2018 at 12:17 pm
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      I couldn’t agree with your sentiments more Lisa. The whole region, including Tahiti and Papeete (where I was lucky enough to get engaged!), is truly beautiful and visiting a place like Pitcairn Island for a holiday would be fabulous for most… but living there with only 49 other people in complete isolation would not suit most people at all. It was still lovely to see the place though and appreciate the beauty of the island as it is.

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  • December 30, 2018 at 10:21 am
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    I only know of Pitcairn Island in relation to the historic HMS Bounty mutiny. It looks like an amazingly remote and pristine place to visit, probably in large part down to how hard it to is to get there! Interesting to see that the very rural-looking Adamstown is nonetheless the main residential area, with the rest of the island undeveloped.

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    • December 30, 2018 at 9:42 pm
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      Definitely agree with you there Kavita. The residents are really trying to encourage more people to visit but there is a comparatively small number of tourists prepared to spend the time and money to get there. It would definitely be fun to explore the island more for a while.

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  • December 30, 2018 at 6:56 am
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    Wow what a journey! That took some serious work to get there only to end with a 32 hour crossing?? Looks gorgeous and I know you said it was beautiful and untouched but was it worth the journey and expense? The first time I ever heard of Pitcairn Island was a few years ago when it made the news that it had legalised same sex marriage despite not having any same sex couples residing on the island. I thought that was hilarious!

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    • December 30, 2018 at 9:38 pm
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      That’s an interesting question you pose Amy about whether it would be worth it to actually go to Pitcairn for an actual holiday. You would really need to ask someone who has gone there for a holiday to get an answer as I took the option to see it as part of a cruise across the South Pacific (outlined above). I suppose the bottom line is different for all of us, depending on our individual time and financial ability, together with how much we want to do something like this. Hadn’t heard about the same-sex marriage law change there. It does sound interesting for a community of just 50 people that supposedly don’t have any same-sex couples.

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  • December 30, 2018 at 12:35 am
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    The first time I’ve heard about Pitcairn Island was in a movie about the the famous ‘Mutiny on the Bounty.’ It must be interesting seeing it in person, but considering how remote it is I would probably never make it there. I’m glad to have read more about it in your post though. I enjoyed your clips as well.

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    • December 30, 2018 at 9:30 pm
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      Similar to you Anda, I also remember a Mutiny on the Bounty movie and a couple of remakes that have been done since then. The more modern clips that I included links to in this post really show how it is there and you would imagine it would have been very much the same back at the time of the mutiny. Thank you for taking the time to comment.

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  • December 28, 2018 at 9:00 pm
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    Thank you for your article on Pitcairn Island. What a beautiful place to live but so isolated as you mention. I remember doing the Mutiny of the Bounty at school but never thought much more about Pitcairn Island and its residents. I really enjoyed the videos.

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    • December 30, 2018 at 9:25 pm
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      Thank you very much Jane. It is indeed beautiful but I have no idea what it would be like to live there permanently. The videos do give more of a feel for the place for sure.

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