Taking timeout during recovery

Taking timeout during recovery 1
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Taking timeout during recovery is so important to the healing process

By Michelle Peterson

When you’re in the process of recovering from an addiction, the more you can focus on treatment and avoid stressors and triggers, the better off you’ll be. With that in mind, taking a camping sabbatical can help to ensure your success. Here’s some practical advice for taking time for yourself so you can make positive changes.

 

Time to Regroup

Are you considering getting away from it all so you can regroup? Taking a sabbatical can be a breath of fresh air when it comes to recovering from an addiction. According to scientific research, creating a new life for yourself is key to securing your future health. Think in terms of reframing your life to ensure long-term success. A camping sabbatical is a chance to build a solid self-care routine and connect with nature, and it’s an inexpensive way to get away from the stresses and influences that might contribute to a relapse. Financing for a sabbatical can be challenging, but camping can be a low-cost opportunity to get away and allow you to regroup.

 

Prepare Your Home

Turning your home into a rental property for the duration of your leave is a great way to bring in some income and offset financial hiccups. Even though you intend to return, how you present the property can make a big difference in how quickly it rents, the quality of renters, and the price you can charge. Plan to bring any maintenance issues up to speed before your departure, and stage your home in a manner that is attractive to renters. Refer to an online guide to ensure you cover all your bases so you can then relax and focus on your sabbatical.

 

Leaving Work Behind

If you’re taking a break from an established career, it’s important to give your company as much notice as possible. Sta Travel notes that in order to secure your sabbatical, be ready to convince your employer that taking leave is a worthwhile opportunity. Plan to explain how this will benefit both you and the company. You don’t need to discuss your personal situation unless you want to do so. You can talk about things like your expectation to come back rejuvenated with new ideas and a fresh perspective. Point out that some professionals feel a vacation or weekend is not sufficient for avoiding burnout, and the benefits far outweigh any drawbacks. You can explain that some studies show a sabbatical can completely revamp a career, noting improved productivity, better insights, and enhanced leadership upon return to work.

 

Weighing in on worries

You might be worried about the impact of a sabbatical beyond your workplace. For instance, many people are concerned about how a sabbatical will affect their credit. If you have savings, minimal or no debt, and a source of income while you’re on break, chances are you will be fine. Other situations should be weighed carefully, as the stress related to a financial downfall can contribute to relapse. Another worry is explaining a sabbatical on your resume. The information you provide and how you approach your explanation requires some personal introspection. Consider putting a note in your cover letter, and remember to word things favorably. Look for some specific examples of your gains, such as returning with an enhanced perspective, new ideas, and other ways your sabbatical refreshed your career.

 

Taking timeout during recovery and getting away from it all can be a terrific refresher, providing an opportunity to reframe your life. Plan and prepare carefully, and think through the impact on your career and finances. When you’re in recovery, a camping sabbatical can be just the break you need.

 

Guest Author at

Michelle Peterson is based in Anaheim, California and has been in recovery for several years.

She started RecoveryPride.org to help eliminate the stigma placed on those who struggle with addiction.

The site emphasizes that the journey to sobriety should not be one of shame but of pride and offers stories, victories, and other information to give hope and help to those in recovery.

13 thoughts on “Taking timeout during recovery

  • February 26, 2019 at 9:13 pm
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    A great read as always and I must say there cant be anything better then nature and being away from the real world and day to day routine when trying to get over an addiction. The long break is a must I but it can be tough getting away from a permanent job ( but the tips about giving long notice might just get you over it ) Renting out your property could help with the finances as well as keep your house occupied while you are away. Thanks for sharing and if you can leave all your worries behind and head for that green sabbatical I would recommend it to anyone.

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  • February 24, 2019 at 8:10 pm
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    It is very difficult to overcome the addiction. I have seen this closely and I have seen people struggling. Someone with addiction needs great willpower to win the game, but of course, it is not impossible. For those that live in the countries where sabbatical leave is granted, they should definitely take advantage of that. I agree with the gap explanation by coming back with fresh ideas and returning with an enhanced perspective. Thank you for another interesting article.

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  • February 24, 2019 at 3:40 pm
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    I totally agree with your tips. For me is really good way to rent home during the period of recovery. Not many people do like that! I’m glad that you mention about the idea!

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  • February 22, 2019 at 3:13 pm
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    Quite an inspiring post to help people through recovery from addiction. I agree with each and every point here. Taking time off work is important but it is also important to leave on a positive note so that you don’t have problems in returning after sabbatical.

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  • February 22, 2019 at 10:26 am
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    It’s tough but not impossible. I have gone through this so I can actually understand how it works. With a lot of family support and diverting your mind and body to do constructive things always helps. Camping in the outdoors is top of the list. Beautiful article.

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  • February 19, 2019 at 8:14 am
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    This is a very interesting post. It is quite different from the usual ones I read because it focuses on how taking a timeout can help speed up your recovery. These issues are usually not addressed publicly. I am glad you took time to write about it. Taking time out to focus on yourself and leaving your worries behind is definitely a great way to get better. I love your tips on preparing the home and explaining at work. They can be very useful.

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  • February 18, 2019 at 10:49 pm
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    Love all the tips that you have shared. It is important to take time out, focus on yourself and keep improving. Such a helpful post, I keep trying to take digital detox every now and then.

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    • February 21, 2019 at 8:01 am
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      Taking the time off is good to regain your strength not only physically, but overall. You’ll get a clean slate, and an opportunity to gain new ideas and opportunities. But keep an open mind. Take the time and enjoy it.

      Reply
  • February 18, 2019 at 10:07 pm
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    Great article. I truly believe that everyone should have time out. You have shared some great tips. I had not thought about renting your place out during this time. This is definitely ‘food for thought.’ thanks.

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  • February 18, 2019 at 9:41 pm
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    Great advice! I never took a sabbatical so far, but if need be to take one I would definitely worry about the impact it would have on many things in my life. Truth is that if you need to recover you have to leave all worries aside and concentrate on what’s really important: getting well.

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  • February 18, 2019 at 6:28 pm
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    I think it’s important to take a sabbatical from life in general every now and again! Of course, it’s not always possible and your tips help move that bit closer to making it happen. I think renting out your home is a great idea. I do that when we’re away and it helps me out a lot.

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  • February 18, 2019 at 2:48 pm
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    Very interesting, never thought of doing a camping sabbatical. Finances are always what I worry about when needing a break but camping will offer an affordable way to escape and a connection with nature, now why hadn’t I thought of that? And renting out my home, umm some food for thought here. Glad I came across this post today!

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  • February 18, 2019 at 2:23 pm
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    An inspiring post to help anyone get through a period of recovery. I do appreciate your suggestion to prepare the home and also consider renting it out during the period of recovery – that would definitely help eleviate the stress of financing the recovery. Camping does sound like a great way to boost recovery – the fresh air of being out in the nature, to be disconnected to help you focus on yourself and your recovery. I find this is the perfect digital detox to help find realignment.

    Reply

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