Solo Trekking in Zhangjiajie Mountains of China

Zhangjiajie 1

Overcoming Fear as a Solo Trekker in Zhangjiajie Mountains of China

By Marinel de Jesus

Catching the sunset after landing in China

My very first entry to China was through the Hunan Province in 2014. As it turns out it, if you’re new to China, Hunan will shock you because it is far from the notion of a foreigner mecca in terms of tourism. In fact, the entire time I was in this part of China, I only saw one Western foreigner – a European who was studying the language and therefore able to move around the country with ease. He told me he was on a short break and his parents were in town so he was acting as their guide in this part of China. He also happened to be staying at my hostel.

The night spent chatting with him was unforgettable. This said individual challenged my decision to be in Hunan. He bluntly asked what I was doing there as he was concerned that I didn’t speak any Mandarin at all. He added that a better move would have been to go visit Guilin first or one of the big cities like Shanghai or Beijing, even Xian. But Hunan – he asked why. With enthusiasm, I explained that I was there because I wanted to see the Avatar mountains, also known as Zhangjiajie National Forest. That explanation appeared to baffle him. Still, why would I start my China travel by hitting Hunan first? He continued to counsel me that getting around will be difficult and that I should be prepared to navigate my way because even getting to the National Forest will be a challenge. So, I said, well, I will get a map! No, you just don’t get it. Even the map is devoid of English completely, he says. Okay, I heard the warning. But I wasn’t dissuaded about my decision to be there. Even though a bit nervous because he insisted that I will likely get lost, I kept reassuring myself that there is always a way. Plus, this was nothing new. I have been in a situation before where I was overwhelmed by the language issue (Guatemala) and that experience turned out to be life changing. So, hush that worry-wart – it will always work out for the best.

I never was able to shake off that night of conversation with this European guy who was understandably concerned for my sake. It was amusing but also I must admit a bit disturbing. After all, it was my very first night in China and to begin with I was already a bit concerned about how I would do in this country without much language skills to get me by. So, that night I told myself it will be alright even if it means I may get lost. That’s part of the adventure, right? I didn’t come to a foreign place to be on point with all directions and roads. I came to see where the roads will take me and what turns I would need to make to find the right way.

On a much more positive note, the hostel I stayed at was one of the hostel chains through the Hostelling International. It was a cosy place for a first night in China. I was really just looking into resting my head in the upper bed of the bunk for some good night’s sleep.

The next day I made my way to the smaller town of Wulingyuan where I was to catch the bus to enter Zhangjiajie. On my stop over at Wulingyuan, I decided to check out the cave nearby which was probably the most touristy cave that I have ever seen. Although the cave was huge and appealing in its size, there was nothing special about it; nonetheless, it was a good way to get used to dealing with the “crowd.” At my hostel in Wulingyuan, I met by a coincidence a Cambodian traveller and we chatted a little. He was travelling for a few months and had positive things to say about his travels in China, which was a refreshing moment compared to the night before.

The next morning I made it to Zhangjiajie without a problem. Thanks to the hostel staff who explained to me how I could get to the place. The European guy was right. There was no English whatsover to be read or heard except for some silly signs (see below). This was the beginning of my journey as the ‘mute’ version of myself. Sounds crazy but in many ways, it was a blessing because it allowed me to learn the value of being “mindful” of what people were actually saying in any means possible. That turned out to be such a critical part of my trip. I know that is such a weird thing to say but, seriously, muting myself made China a wonderful experience, most definitely.

To fully explore Zhangjiajie, I decided to spend 3-4 days inside the park. From my research, the karst-like peaks are elusive due to the foggy situation of the park. Usually, the mountains are hidden behind thick fog; hence, I was not to have a high expectation of catching a glimpse of these pillars of beauty. To execute my plan, I decided to stay inside the park where a hostel was available to budget travellers. It was a basic hostel with a nice bed to myself (not even bunk) within a little village. I suspect the people in that village are people who work at the park. Living within the park is the convenient way given the park takes up a huge space. Like any other national park in China, the mode of getting around within the park is through their shuttles which run from sunrise to sunset. China is efficient when it comes to shuttles for parks and so much so that one should not feel discouraged by the crowd factor. Oftentimes, the lines go faster than you expect.

To maximize my time in Zhangjiajie, I planned out the routes to take in order to see most of the highlights of the park. With the park map in hand, I basically divided each day by which areas to hike so I can capture the mountain peaks. The map itself was in Mandarin and so I relied mostly on the hostel staff (again, which was the pattern) to help me figure out the most viable itinerary. The first day presented as super foggy and it was discouraging to go through the trails knowing there is beauty hidden behind such fog but not being able to see it. Luckily, my luck changed and when the afternoon came, I was able to experience the magical beauty of the mountains in Zhangjiajie. For the next two days, the fog came and went. Having the fog was actually adding to that mysterious feeling behind the mountains. Hiking in this park does require luck and patience in order to capture the mountains at the right photographic moment.

Zhangjiajie 3
That’s not a regret a hiker would like

As an added bonus, during my stay within the park, I met a lovely couple from Beijing who befriended me at the hostel and who spoke good English as is the case with people from big cities in China. They became my hiking buddies for the entire duration of my hiking in Avatar. After immersing ourselves in hiking each day, our days ended with home cooked meals at the hostel – the best part of being friends with locals is that they can help you order food at restaurants. Travelling solo without language skills has its downside and that is the difficulty of figuring out what to eat each mealtime. When we returned to the city, the couple and I had our one last meal together which I often recall being such a feast!

Oh, and we did go to another park in the city center that was like the mini-Avatar but the park charged quite a more expensive entry fee. That was a waste because it was foggy the entire day we were there. The only upside is we did go check out some gorgeous temples. The couple found it necessary to enter one of them to ask the gods for a child as they have been wanting to have their first one. I also fancied the conversation I had with the couple about how the locals gravitate towards spending more time with nature as they get older for they believe that by doing so, it lengthens their life and adds joy.

Zhangjiajie is worth a visit. Yet, only a few foreigners ever make it to this part of China. That’s good for western travellers as you can still feel the authenticity of the locals. No one is aggressively pestering you so they can make a sale of some sort. The entire park is still catered only to serve Chinese tourists which makes for a unique experience on its own. And the mountains? Yes, it was zen. I had an opportunity to hike solo on the first day and an early morning hike on another day by myself (without the crowd) and it was an amazing place to just be on your own – a serene experience. Contrary to what the European guy said, I think starting this journey with Zhangjiajie was setting the bar quite high. It had to get better from here.

And sorry to disappoint Mr European guy, but not once did I get lost! And even if I did, the park was not as intimidating as I thought it would be. And the locals themselves are much friendlier than anticipated. They truly like to help and that was also how I was able to get around without knowing a word of their language. So, as a solo trekker who found language to be a challenge, don’t let it stop you! Have faith that with a bit of luck and some effort on your end, you’ll be perfectly fine. Plus, you will always end up with new friends.

Zhangjiajie 6

Zhangjiajie 7

Zhangjiajie 8

Zhangjiajie 9

Zhangjiajie 10

Zhangjiajie 11

Zhangjiajie 12

Zhangjiajie 13

One last look before a final bye.

 

 

Multiple Contributor at | Website

Brown Gal Trekker (Marinel de Jesus) is a nomad at heart who survives the mountains to write about them.

She launched her social enterprise, Peak Explorations, in 2016 to market lesser-known mountain regions globally as trekking destinations with a focus on solo travellers while supporting local sustainable tourism.

Along with her blog, Brown Gal Trekker, Peak Explorations aims to promote women and diversity in the outdoors.

42 thoughts on “Solo Trekking in Zhangjiajie Mountains of China

  • January 29, 2020 at 11:03 am
    Permalink

    As a hiker/trekker and a fan of China, this part I still havent conquered and can’t wait to get out there asap. The landscape is just stunning, I dont think there is any other areas of our beautiful planet which is like this. Most of the time I prefer to hike solo but in very unknown areas, having a trusty person with you can make the difference, to make the trip perfect especially if they know the area and take some of the pressure of yourself. When I hike in Europe, I go alone but if I was hiking here (to which I hope), I probably want someone with me.

    Reply
  • December 15, 2018 at 1:28 pm
    Permalink

    This trek at Zhangjiajie Mountains looks so thrilling and adventurous. This was such an interesting read and I am so inspired to go on this trek.

    Reply
  • May 10, 2017 at 3:14 pm
    Permalink

    Those “mountains” kind of look like daggers to me so no wonder you had a fear haha. I don’t blame you! So happy you faced your fears, and conquered those mountains. I had no idea they even had mountains like that in China!! You go!!!

    Reply
  • May 3, 2017 at 1:33 am
    Permalink

    The mountains are so heavenly and trekking must be super fun. Loved the pictures.

    Reply
  • May 1, 2017 at 9:34 pm
    Permalink

    Wow these are such breathtaking pictures! I would love to go here! I can imagine how this would totally be hard for me as I have great fear of heights but way to go on facing your fears and continuing to do what you LOVE!

    Reply
  • May 1, 2017 at 9:08 pm
    Permalink

    I wouldn’t want to do anything like this alone. I would love to see those mountains though.

    Reply
    • May 4, 2017 at 11:52 pm
      Permalink

      There are so many people on the trails so even going alone is not bad. It’s pretty safe and definitely worth checking out.

      Reply
  • May 1, 2017 at 7:39 pm
    Permalink

    That must have been a once in a lifetime experience. I personally have only traveled alone to the USA and even then, it was in a big city. I can only imagine how amazing exploring the mountains of China would be!

    Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 9:57 pm
    Permalink

    What a beautiful place! It really makes me want to go there and I would just love to see this in person.

    Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 5:51 pm
    Permalink

    What a beautiful way to enjoy the mountains of China. These look intimidating but gorgeous at the same time. I would enjoy a hike through these, but not alone!

    Reply
    • May 4, 2017 at 11:54 pm
      Permalink

      Doing alone is easy! It is a very touristy area so you don’t really need to feel as if you’re in a remote area. I recommend having a dictionary thought just in case!

      Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 3:33 pm
    Permalink

    I saw this place in a video while planing my trip for china, I felt in love. This place it’s amazing. Since we don’t speak Chinese, we decide to contract an English speaking tour guide. This place Is super crowded mainly by the Chinese tours but that did not take away all the natural beauty you can appreciate.

    Reply
    • May 4, 2017 at 11:55 pm
      Permalink

      Yes! I agree- even with the crowd, it’s still an incredible experience. I recommend staying overnight as you then get to see it without the crowds in the early morning and evening hours!

      Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 3:01 pm
    Permalink

    This is incredible! I think you are pretty amazing girl! I could never imagine doing this solo.

    Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 4:58 am
    Permalink

    I would have been terrified to climb these mountains by myself. I’m sure that it was an exhilarating experience and that the sights were breathtaking.

    Reply
    • May 4, 2017 at 11:58 pm
      Permalink

      The trails were very good and it almost felt like Disneyland kind of experience as they do maintain the trails very well so you can enjoy the place without worrying so much about safety.

      Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 4:56 am
    Permalink

    Sounds like a fun adventure. I am trying to step outside my comfort zone more

    Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 3:06 am
    Permalink

    Decisiveness is the best attitude! The European guy did not know how strong you are mentally and physically. I am glad that you met hospitable and helpful locals. I am hesitant sometimes to talk to locals because of the language barrier but there nice ones who will find a way for you to understand them better.
    Zhangjiajie mountains look very challenging but you made it! It is also interesting to know that these are the Avatar mountains.

    Reply
    • May 4, 2017 at 11:59 pm
      Permalink

      Thanks! I was scared partly but what the heck – I was already there! It worked out better than I imagined!

      Reply
  • April 30, 2017 at 1:29 am
    Permalink

    First off, you are brave! I won’t even go hiking in the canyons near my house! This seems like it was so worth it though. Wow what a beautiful park. And like you said, most people never make it that part of China. BTW the fact that you didn’t get lost once impresses me even more!

    Reply
    • May 5, 2017 at 12:01 am
      Permalink

      Thanks for the compliment! It did take a bit of mental fortitude to undergo the challenged. Glad I did!

      Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 8:07 pm
    Permalink

    I enjoy hiking but don’t usually go on my own. This looks like an amazing trek!

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 5:44 pm
    Permalink

    What a fun solo trip! Glad you didn’t listen to the European guy and went anyway! While I wouldn’t want to go to a foreign country when I didn’t speak the language by myself, I’m all for solo traveling!

    Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 11:06 am
    Permalink

    WOW! You have been really a brave girl! I like when someone feels excitement discovering such unexplored places. And look at those pictures, I never seen growing such a rich nature grow upon mountains with that weird shape.

    Reply
    • May 5, 2017 at 12:01 am
      Permalink

      Thanks! It’s hard to top this experience in some ways when it comes to off the beaten path – raises the bar! Since then I have been addicted to countries where I hardly can speak the language 🙂 I guess that’s a good thing!

      Reply
  • April 29, 2017 at 3:25 am
    Permalink

    Its only recently that I have heard about Zhangjiajie Mountains of China and its on my bucketlist. I didnt know that you could stay in the park…I thought its a day trip only. Loved your pics….what stunning pillars of beauty!

    Reply
  • April 28, 2017 at 11:48 pm
    Permalink

    Amazing photos!

    Reply
  • April 28, 2017 at 11:44 pm
    Permalink

    Your story was well written and captivating. I’m glad you didn’t let Mr. European put doubts in your head that made you turn away from your plan. Wow, those mountains are stunning – and the clouds add a cool dimension!

    Reply
    • May 5, 2017 at 12:02 am
      Permalink

      Thanks! Yes, lesson learned- trust yourself and don’t always listen to what other travelers tell you! Our experiences are unique always.

      Reply
  • April 28, 2017 at 11:43 pm
    Permalink

    These photos are stunning. I would love to go and explore these beautiful mountains.

    Reply
  • April 28, 2017 at 9:58 pm
    Permalink

    Wow that is a wonderful topic. I love hiking and trekking but always go in a group. Never been in China neither but will definitely consider these tips 🙂

    Reply
    • May 5, 2017 at 12:04 am
      Permalink

      It’s good tip to go with a group but going solo in this place is not bad. A bit of a challenge with language but certainly doable!

      Reply
  • April 28, 2017 at 8:34 pm
    Permalink

    Those mountains are UNREAL!!! I would love to do this. When we went trekking in Vietnam we met multiple females traveling on their own and it was so fun to make friends. I feel like traveling alone really does push you outside of your comfort zone and forces you to grow all the more. Love this post!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: